Croissants

Croissants are one of those things I’ve always been a bit terrified to try making, mainly because its practically a twenty-four hour process and also there seem to be a lot of things that can go wrong!

IMG_4167

But there comes a time in life when one must face their fears, even if these fears are purely based in butter, yeast and a bit of sugar.

IMG_4169 

Also, I finished uni on Friday (woo!) so I now have pretty much unlimited time to mess around with such things as butter and yeast and sugar. So croissants were a must.

IMG_4171

Croissants are kind of weird, because they start life as bread (flour and yeast, mixed together). But then, the dough is rolled out, and, as with puff pastry, a horrifyingly huge slab of butter is laid on top. Then comes the fairly painful process of rolling out, folding over, letting rest, rolling out, folding over, letting rest (x3) that gives the croissant its layers. This is pretty crucial, so do not attempt to make croissants in a rush!

IMG_4186

Finally, the dough is cut into triangles and rolled into crescents, then left for one final rise, then baked.

IMG_4191

Mine were (probably) not quite French patisserie quality, but hey, it was a first attempt! And they were pretty delicious for a Sunday morning treat!

 IMG_4211

Croissants (for this recipe I looked at lots of different sources, including Paul Hollywood’s website)

500g flour (I used a mixture of plain and strong white bread flour)

10g salt

80g caster sugar

10g instant yeast

300ml cool water

300g butter

Put the flour in a large bowl or in a mixer. Put the salt and sugar on one side of the bowl and the yeast on the other. Add the water and start to mix. Go slowly at first, then speed it up, until the dough is quite stiff. Shape into a ball and leave to rest in the fridge for an hour.

Roll the dough out into a rectangle. Flatten the butter to a rectangle the same width and two thirds of the length (so, for example if your dough is 60 x 20 cm, flatten the butter to 40 x 19 cm. Making it a tiny bit smaller will ensure that it doesn’t seep out the edges.) Place the butter over one end of the pastry. Fold the exposed dough over the butter, like so:

IMG_4130 IMG_4132

Then fold the other side over, so that you have alternating layers of butter and dough. Put back into the fridge to let the butter harden for an hour.

Take the dough out of the fridge and roll into a rectangle, as before. Fold one third up to the centre, then the other third over the first, so that you have a neat square with three layers of dough. Put back into the fridge for an hour. Repeat this process twice more. Then let your dough rest in the fridge over night or for at least eight hours.

IMG_4135

When you are ready to shape, roll out to a rectangle, and cut into triangles with a longer base than sides.

IMG_4149 IMG_4150

Roll up and shape into crescents. Place on a lined baking sheet and allow to rise for two hours, or until doubled in size. Heat your oven to 200 degree Celcius. Before baking, lightly egg wash each croissant to give it a shiny top, then bake for 15-20 minutes or until golden brown.

IMG_4154 IMG_4159

Serve warm with butter, jam and lots of coffee.

IMG_4164

xxR

Advertisements

One thought on “Croissants

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s